2018 Mid-Season Invitational: Three Interesting Developments with the Meta

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2018 Mid-Season Invitational: Three Interesting Developments with the Meta

Disclaimer: Do not try this at home without duo supervision and/or significant experience/skill, side effects may include: nausea, being flamed in SoloQ, confusion, loss of LP and MMR, blurry vision, demotion to Bronze V, moderate to severe amnesia and tilt.

With the 2018 Mid-Season Invitational almost done, several developments to the meta on Patch 8.8 have occurred. The meta at the beginning and end of the tournament will always look very different as seen with previous international competitions (Miss Fortune Support in 2016 Worlds, Fervor Leona in 2017 Worlds). These changes tend to occur as a response to other power picks in the meta and can make significant impact within the draft stage of a series, potentially resulting in bans or denial picks. Whilst not all players at the tournament are as capable on these picks as others, practice and scrimmage time can lead to the addition of these picks into their champion pools for further use.

1. Blind Pick Yasuo Mid

With MSI being held in Europe, what better way to represent the character of the region than the ultimate SoloQ champion in Yasuo? Once thought of as a counter-pick seen exclusively in the top lane to match up against Gnar, Mr. Hasaki himself has risen to blind pick status in the mid lane as a comfort pick for Rasmus “Caps” Winther. The Fnatic mid-laner may only have a 1-2 record on the champion during the Group Stage in Berlin, but has drawn numerous bans against it and in all three games, blind picked it.

 Though popular amongst many League of Legends casual players, Yasuo did not feature often on the international stage until this year's MSI.

Though popular amongst many League of Legends casual players, Yasuo did not feature often on the international stage until this year's MSI.

Early in Season 8, Yasuo mid was seldom considered in professional play due to the ease in itemising against him, a side effect from Runes Reforged not providing a satisfactory replacement for Fervor of Battle. With the debut of the Conqueror Keystone in professional play at MSI, Yasuo is now able to punch through the defences of an early Seeker’s Armguard. Other power picks of Karma, Ryze, Swain etc. may deny a few CS from Yasuo in the laning phase, but the combination of Bone Plating and Second Wind in the Resolve tree prevents him from being pushed out of the lane or outright dying. In the mid-game, these champions are simply not able to match Yasuo’s split-pushing pressure and can expect to give a solo kill over without significant caution being taken. Though not as successful as Caps, Eugene “Pobelter” Park and Gwak “Bdd” Bo-Seong of Team Liquid and Kingzone DragonX respectively have played Yasuo mid at MSI.

 

Expect to see more of Yasuo later this season in Rift Rivals, Summer Split and potentially Worlds, bar some drastic nerfs in later patches. As for SoloQ, it’s Yasuo; even if this development did not occur, he will still be seen going 0/8/0 flashing that Mastery 7 emote.

 Be prepared for the influx of aspiring Yasuo wannabes in SoloQ. As the saying goes, "you win some, you lose some."

Be prepared for the influx of aspiring Yasuo wannabes in SoloQ. As the saying goes, "you win some, you lose some."

2. Teleport Ezreal

Though Heal is the Summoner Spell of choice for all ADCs alongside Flash for the sake of survivability, Kim “PraY” Jong-in demonstrated the power of Teleport Ezreal in Kingzone DragonX’s Day 1 game against Team Liquid. Initially thought to be the consequence of Kang “GorillA” Beom-Hyeon running Heal on Soraka (the Summoner Spell of choice on her other than Barrier since it allows her to survive to heal up her teammates, rather than the more aggressive Ignite or Exhaust), PraY then ran the same Summoner Spell setup with GorillA’s Tahm Kench who ran Ignite in Kingzone’s games against Royal Never Give Up and EVOS Espots.

 Though the lack of the sustain should be a sign of trouble for all ADCs, including Ezreal, his safe laning through the range of Mystic Shot and the self-peel of Arcane Shift enables him to get through most match ups.

Though the lack of the sustain should be a sign of trouble for all ADCs, including Ezreal, his safe laning through the range of Mystic Shot and the self-peel of Arcane Shift enables him to get through most match ups.

It is optimal for Ezreal to buy his Tear of the Goddess as soon as possible so that he can begin stacking it. With Teleport, Ezreal can Recall to base as soon as he earns 750 gold (850 gold for us amateur plebs on Patch 8.10) and immediately come back to lane without missing CS.  This is not the case with Heal, where the window for back timings is tighter, thus delaying the building and subsequent stacking of Tear. Other Ezreal games at MSI have suggested that this may be the norm for this champion in future professional games, with Jian “Uzi” Zi-Hao and Lu “Betty” Yu-Hang picking up wins for Royal Never Give Up and Flash Wolves using the same set up respectively.

 Could we see Doublelift take Teleport on Ezreal later this season?

Could we see Doublelift take Teleport on Ezreal later this season?

As for SoloQ, the more volatile nature of bot lane presents Heal as the better option. However, do consider Teleport for Ezreal if duoing with a support that understands the limits of safety in a matchup and can provide a strong force in lane such as a constantly-healing Soraka or a Tahm Kench with global presence; other ADCs simply do not have as safe a laning phase, nor benefit as strongly from the more generous back timings to take Teleport.

3. Marksmen Junglers

 Time for the marksman junglers to dominate the jungle, that is if there is still a jungle left after the most recent jungle changes.

Time for the marksman junglers to dominate the jungle, that is if there is still a jungle left after the most recent jungle changes.

Whilst there have been metas where Graves and Kindred are extremely powerful, it is nonetheless surprising to see their presence in professional play here at MSI, as Olaf, Sejuani and Zac have dominated the meta for most of Season 8. With a focus towards bot lane in Patch 8.8, tank and bruisers are typically chosen to peel for the ADC in late game team-fights. As a response to these tanks and bruisers, Trundle has emerged as a major power pick, being able to clear quickly, countergank effectively and absolutely shred their defences with the use of Subjugate.

 

To counter Trundle, Graves and Kindred have emerged. Trundle is both Graves and Kindred’s best matchup; they can dash through his Pillar of Ice, and since they don’t have much armor or magic resistance, Subjugate is useless against them. Though Graves has a greater priority over Kindred due to his considerably healthier clear, both serve a similar purpose; both have strong counterjungling ability through kiting and their burst damage lends itself to counterganking. Unlike Kindred, Graves can be blind picked due to his more favourable matchups against the other meta junglers, though the assassins of Kha’Zix and Nocturne remain tough matchups. Kindred’s Marks allow for their pathing to be read easily, but the damage and scaling given by earning Marks is a worthwhile reward.

 

With the recent jungle changes on Patch 8.10, Graves and Kindred are especially strong as their existing pathing options did not experience many changes and are largely unaffected by nerfs to jungle items. Though the bonus attack speed has been removed from Hunter’s Machete, Graves and Kindred already use the Precision tree, so this impact is minimal. Should these jungle changes stick, Graves and Kindred should be considered as two top tier jungle picks for both professional and SoloQ play.

 

Written by Iain "Arkk003" Lew [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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MSI Team Analysis: Royal Never Give Up (RNG)

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MSI Team Analysis: Royal Never Give Up (RNG)

As this year’s Mid-Season Invitationals play-in knockouts come to a spectacular end, let’s take a look at one team on our radar that the wildcard winners might find themselves challenging in the much anticipated group stage.

With the notable absence of SK Telecom, many teams have gathered to lay claim to the MSI crown. Besides the usual  Korean hype train, Royal Never Give Up (RNG) is the team to watch as their incredibly gifted ADC Jian “Uzi” Zi-Hao arrives on a high after his first LPL championship victory. Following an incredible 3-1 sweep over their rivals EDward Gaming in the finals of their spring split, this star-studded roster may very well be the next MSI champions.

 

Since captivating the world with his heroic performance in season 3 edition of Worlds, Uzi’s mechanically perfect plays have taken him to places from domestic finals to Worlds finals on multiple occasions. Along the way, he has continued to take pentakills wherever he sees them and never misses a double shot. Famed for being one of the best Vayne and Lucian players in the world, there are few supports that can reach his high expectations as a lane partner. Being the player that claimed the most kills at both the 2014 and 2017 world championships, Uzi could bring a bloodbath with him this year as he joins MSI for the first time. But despite his legendary career, Uzi has had a seemingly empty trophy room in the past. At multiple Worlds tournaments Uzi has always finished just shy of absolute victory, a serious contender yet never able to seal the deal. However, with his recent wins in the 2017 All Stars event and the 2018 LPL spring split, could Uzi’s new-found momentum be enough to break his notorious ‘runner up’ curse?

 

 

Besides Uzi, RNG’s world-class midlaner Li “Xiaohu” Yuan-Hao will be another massive drawcard given his previous track record with aggressive Azir and Leblanc plays. Xiaohu’s proactive yet controlled playstyle has been incredibly vital to RNG’s splits, and his noteworthy performance at Worlds 2017 scored him a KDA of 7.6; nearly leading RNG to an upset against SKT in the semi-finals. Time and time again Xiaohu has proven with dominating fashion to be one of the world’s best midlaners, going toe-to-toe with players such as SKT’s “Faker” and “Crown” from Generation Gaming. In the current Korean-dominated scene, Xiaohu’s consistent performance has made him a legitimate threat. His presence will challenge the Korean dynasty.

 

Although Uzi and Xiaohu are the headliners of RNG, their recent success was still a team effort. Forming the backbone of this all Chinese roster is Liu “Mlxg” Shi-Yu - his undeniable chemistry with the rest of RNG was demonstrated during the spring split semi-finals when he surprised Invictus Gaming with early ganks in lieu of clearing camps. Sharing the role of jungler with Mlxg is Hung “Karsa” Hau-Hsuan, who despite his limited appearances for RNG, has shown some promising synergy. RNG’s top-lane will be handled by Yan “Letme” Jun-Ze, whose more consistent playstyle will need to be tweaked depending on which jungler starts. Finally, the man that will bear the duty of supporting RNG’s powerhouse AD carry is Shi “Ming” Sen-Ming. Ming was mentored by Uzi himself during the rookie’s first few splits, and his experiences will hopefully come to fruition in this years MSI.

 RNG's support, Ming, will be a vital cog in ensuring Uzi has all the support he needs to succeed - starting from the basics of laning phase.

RNG's support, Ming, will be a vital cog in ensuring Uzi has all the support he needs to succeed - starting from the basics of laning phase.

There is no doubt Royal Never Give Up will be determined to be crowned victors of an international tournament after their previous failures at the 2016 and 2017 Worlds championships. However, there are still many obstacles to their success as teams like Kingzone Dragonx and Team Liquid are on the prowl. This year’s line-up is unprecedented, as each region’s best AD carries will be competing for the MSI crown. Legendary figures Yiliang Peter “Doublelift” Peng from North America’s Team Liquid and Martin “Rekkles” Larsson from the European Unions’ Fnatic will also be duking it out in the botlane.

 

 KZ AD Carry, PraY, will be the biggest rival Uzi will encounter at MSI. PraY's legendary status in Korea and worldwide will make any match ups between the two a mouth watering clash.

KZ AD Carry, PraY, will be the biggest rival Uzi will encounter at MSI. PraY's legendary status in Korea and worldwide will make any match ups between the two a mouth watering clash.

However, the biggest challenge RNG will have to face is from none other than the LCK. The 2018 MSI marks the first time in the events’ history that South Korea is not represented by SK Telecom T1. Fortunately, their reputation for dominance is in the excellent hands of Kingzone DragonX. The core of Kingzone is in its bot-lane duo of AD carry Kim “PraY” Jong-in and Kang “GorillA” Beom-hyeon. Able to play a huge range of different styles depending on the meta, the versatility and stability of this fearsome duo will truly be a force to behold. RNG’s victory is clearly far from a done deal; can their time-honoured tradition of aggressive playstyles finally take them to the top?

 

 

Written by Colby "kobe lu" Lu [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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2018 MSI Play-Ins Stage Recap

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2018 MSI Play-Ins Stage Recap

Group A

Gambit Esports 5-1 (LCL)

Group A saw the unexpected rise of the LCL represented by Gambit Esports, who had represented the region at the last world championship. Expectations were not high for this team given their poor performance last year, going 0-4 in the Play-In stage. However, the addition of Stanislav “Lodik” Kornelyuk to the roster has paid dividends, especially considering how he just joined the starting lineup in the final weeks of LCL regular season. Lodik’s greater carry potential over long-time starter Daniel “Blasting” Kudrin has proved to be the tipping point the team needed to qualify for the knockout round of the play-ins by dropping only a single game to the GPL champions, Ascension Gaming.

 Gambit defied expectation to top Group A in a performance that revoked the memories of the old Moscow 5 and Albus Nox Luna. This result will be a vital confidence boost for the team heading into the second half of the season.

Gambit defied expectation to top Group A in a performance that revoked the memories of the old Moscow 5 and Albus Nox Luna. This result will be a vital confidence boost for the team heading into the second half of the season.

 

Rainbow7 3-3 (LLN)

With the return of their star ADC Matias “WhiteLotus” Musso froms suspension, many expected Rainbow7 (formerly Lyon Gaming) to top the group, especially given the team’s excellent performance at the last world championships. Yet, R7 only managed a single win against ASC on day 1. Whilst R7 improved to go 2-1 on day 3 by picking up a win against KLG and ASC, it was not enough to avoid elimination from the tournament. Heading home, the team will look towards preparing for the Summer split, and a possible 12th domestic title.

 

Kaos Latin Gamers 2-4 (CLS)

Coming into MSI with a new top laner in Damián "Nate" Rea, KLG performed beyond expectations on day 1 by winning 2 games against ASC and R7 in a Latin America grudge match. Stand out performances from Sebastián "Tierwulf" Andrés Mateluna Cibrario onOlaf during the match against R7 in controlling the jungle matchup, was a major factor in the team’s victory, as well as Joaquín "Plugo" José Pérez 5/0/10 performance on Anivia. Despite their strong initial performances, KLG would go on to lose all 3 of their remaining matches to tie with ASC for last place in Group A.

 

Ascension Gaming 2-4 (GPL)

Following Vietnam’s split from the GPL, Ascension Gaming finally secure their first international appearance, after being edged out by Vietnam’s Young Generation in the 2017 GPL Summer Playoffs for the region’s 2nd seed at the 2017 World Championships. Looking to prove the region’s strength in the post-Vietnam era, their tournament run did not begin well. They dropped all 3 of their opening matches on day 1, including an extremely close and bloody match against R7 that ended with 37 kills between both teams. However, the team bounced back on day 3, picking up matches against KLG and GMB with cleaner macro play to end their MSI run on a high note.

 

Group B

BAU Supermassive 5-1 (TCL)

Turkish champions BAU Supermassive once again showed why they are considered one of the strongest emerging region by dropping only one game against Brazilian champions Kabum e-Sports. Turkey’s dominance in the group was exemplified by their Korean duo of GBM and Snowflower, relying on the former’s carry performances and the latter’s playmaking on champions such as Thresh, going 1/0/17 in a 22-minute victory against Kabum on day 2, the fastest game of the tournament so far.

 Supermassive's performance cements Turkey's claim as one of the most consistent emerging regions in the last couple of years. This performance shows that Turkey will continue to be a region to watch in international tournaments in the future.

Supermassive's performance cements Turkey's claim as one of the most consistent emerging regions in the last couple of years. This performance shows that Turkey will continue to be a region to watch in international tournaments in the future.

 

Kabum e-Sports 3-3 (CBLOL)

Kabum had been through hell and back to return to the international stage after being knocked out in the group stage at the 2014 World Championships and suffering relegation subsequently. Having rebuilt their roster completely, the team looked to uphold Brazil’s reputation for being one of the stronger emerging regions. They had a rough start to the tournament, going 1-2 on day 2 of the play-ins. A mid-stage turnaround, saw the team improve on day 4 to pick up two wins against Dire Wolves and Pentagram. However, it was too little too late, as Supermassive’s victory over Rampage and Dire Wolves secured their spot in the second round, knocking Kabum out of the tournament.

 

Dire Wolves 2-4 (OPL)

The Dire Wolves came into this tournament hungry for international success. Having represented Oceania at both MSI and Worlds in 2017, the Wolves have a combined international record of 3-8 coming into MSI this year. Day 2 of the Play-Ins showed promising signs for the Wolves where they came back from a game 1 defeat at the hands of Supermassive to defeat Kabum and Pentagram off the back of excellent carry performances from top laner Ryan ‘Chippys’ Short. Coming into day 4, the Dire Wolves were confident in finally being able to show the world why OCE should be in the discussion for one of the strongest emerging regions. However, this was not meant to be, as the team would drop all 3 games on the 4th day of competition, heading home with the same record they had last year.

 Dire Wolves failed to perform to the lofty standards they have set themselves. Whilst the result may have been evident from the start, it is still disappointing to see such result.

Dire Wolves failed to perform to the lofty standards they have set themselves. Whilst the result may have been evident from the start, it is still disappointing to see such result.

 

Pentagram 1-5 (LJL)

The 4-time domestic champions formerly known as Rampage was back at MSI. Although not considered one of the strongest regions, Japan has become adept at causing upsets and throwing groups into chaos at international tournaments. Yuta "YutoriMoyasi" Noguchi (ADC) is the star player of this team and was the bright spot on team even in their losses, building a +18 CS Lead at 15 in a loss against Dire Wolves on Day 2 and maintaining a 12 CSPM against Kabum on the same day. The team looked greatly improved on day 4 by holding even against Supermassive in the early to mid-game, and scoring a win against the Dire Wolves; a (hopeful) sign for the future?

 

Knockout Match 1: EVOS Esports (VCS) vs. BAU Supermassive (TUR)

Match Score: EVS 3 – SUP 1

 EVOS showed that the attractive and exciting aggression of the Gigabyte Marines is still well and alive. They will be a team to watch in the main group stage of the tournament.

EVOS showed that the attractive and exciting aggression of the Gigabyte Marines is still well and alive. They will be a team to watch in the main group stage of the tournament.

Hungry to prove that Turkey deserves a spot at the main event with the major regions, Supermassive were in red hot forming coming into the series. EVOS, on the other hand, are a young team; having just recently qualified for the VCS in the promotion tournament last year. EVOS were able to dominate Supermassive through a fast-tempo playstyle reminiscent of the Gigabyte Marines. EVOS jungler Nguyen "YiJin" Le Hai Dang stood out as Graves in games 3 and 4, dictating the pace of the game as well as outfarming his opposing counterpart Furkan “Stormaged” Güngör. Supermassive were able to score a single victory in game 2 by slowing down the pace of the early game and dictating the game tempo to allow Berkay “Zeitnot” Aşıkuzun to scale up on his Kai’Sa to carry the late game. Despite this, EVOS ran away with the series with their aggression to move on to the main event.

 

Knockout Match 2: Flash Wolves (LMS) vs. Gambit Esports (RU)

Match Score: FW 3 – GMB 0

 Swordart has always been a stalwart in the Flash Wolves. After losing Karsa to RNG in China, Swordart must now lead the young Flash Wolves alongside Maple to show that the LMS is still competitive on the world stage.

Swordart has always been a stalwart in the Flash Wolves. After losing Karsa to RNG in China, Swordart must now lead the young Flash Wolves alongside Maple to show that the LMS is still competitive on the world stage.

Coming into 2018, many had doubts about the Flash Wolves as the team lost star jungler, Hung "Karsa" Hau-Hsuan, who was a key part to the team’s success over the last 2 years. Going into this match, many pundits had predicted Gambit to be competitive against the LMS champions. Not even close. In reality, the Flash Wolves dismantled any attempt by Gambit to gain an advantage. On the back of captain Hu "SwordArt" Shuo-Chieh’s incredible play-making ability through early roams on Alistar, the Flash Wolves demonstrated more disciplined gameplay in contrast to the more chaotic style of EVOS. As the team heads towards the main event, the question remains as to whether or not the LMS can still contend with the best in the world, a question that will be answered during the course of the MSI group stage.

 

The Play-In Stage of MSI 2018 has given us a taste for what the main event will look like, as teams from the emerging regions play on this new patch for the first time. Although for many of these teams their journey ends here, they will look towards the future, especially with the World Championship coming up in less than 5 months.

 

Written by Benjamin "RedPyroMage" Letran [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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MSI Group Stage: The AD Carries of MSI

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MSI Group Stage: The AD Carries of MSI

With play-ins group stage drawing to a close, it is time to focus on the main drawcard of the tournament, the teams from Korea, China, Europe and North America. The teams from these regions are already guaranteed with their spot in the group stage and all have the goal of bringing their region pride and honour. This year, the AD Carry talent pool is perhaps the strongest it has ever been in the entire history of MSI. Hosting names such as Doublelift, Rekkles, Pray and Uzi, who will all be eventually be remembered as legends of their role and their respective regions once they retire, this year’s MSI is sure to bring fireworks. Despite being household names, none of them have ever been to MSI before and all are ready to fight for the chance to be crowned the world’s best AD Carry with the much coveted MSI title.

 

Yiliang “Peter” “Doublelift” Peng (Team Liquid)

With Team Liquid winning the 2018 NA LCS Spring Split in a 3-0 clean sweep over 100 Thieves, Doublelift became the first player in NA LCS to win titles on three different teams. For this tournament, Doublelift is here to prove that all other teams are trash. With a KDA of 35.3 after dying only three times in the playoffs, Doublelift is ready to show that he is not just the best AD Carry in NA since his debut, but also across all regions.

 

Martin “Rekkles” Larsson (Fnatic)

After ending G2’s dynasty and reclaiming the throne for Fnatic with a 3-0 sweep, Rekkles is here to make his home region proud. An ADC well known for his aggressiveness and still boasting an insane KDA of 31.5 where he died only twice in the entire playoffs, he’s here to dominate on the MSI stage.

 

Kim “Pray” Jong-in (KingZone DragonX)

With SKT T1 not representing Korea in MSI for the first time, KingZone DragonX will be looking to take the throne with 3/5ths of the mercurial 2016 ROX Tigers. With an all-star team, Pray’s ability to play whatever is required from him enables his team to truly shine on the international stage.

 

Jian “Uzi” Zi-Hao (Royal Never Give Up)

With a domestic title finally under his belt, no AD carry is more well known than Uzi in the history of the game following his heroic performances in Seasons 3 & 4 Worlds. This year, he comes to MSI with one goal in mind; to prove he is the best and win his first international trophy. And with star AD carries from all the regions, there is no better competition as the “Mad Dog” will prove why even an all-star RNG roster like to play around him.

Stats and highlights are taken from Riot Games/Twitch.

Written by Daniel “Arvosa” Wong and Kenzo “Macint0sh Plus” Jeanson [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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LMS: A Region past its Relevance?

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LMS: A Region past its Relevance?

The League of Legends Master Series (LMS), is the professional league for teams based in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau. Over the years, the LMS has produced teams of significant renown such as ahq e-Sports Club, Flash Wolves in recent times as well as perhaps the most famous of them all, Taipei Assassins, who were Worlds champions in Season 2 and is now known as J Team. The LMS had provided us with many wonderful memories in international tournaments. Yet, its dismal performances in recent international tournaments beg the question; is the era of the LMS being classified as one of the big regions over?

 The Taipei Assassins victory at Season 2 Worlds remains the pinnacle of the region's achievements on the international stage. The victory was also the last time the Worlds tournament was won by a non-Korean based team.

The Taipei Assassins victory at Season 2 Worlds remains the pinnacle of the region's achievements on the international stage. The victory was also the last time the Worlds tournament was won by a non-Korean based team.

The LMS has always been a league which punched above its own weight as a region compared to the other big regions of Korea, China, Europe and North America. Despite the smaller server size which limits the available talent pool, the LMS had always produced teams which wowed the world on the international stage. From the glorious triumph of Taipei Assassins who overcame its underdog status to shock the heavy favourites, Moscow Five in the semi-finals and later the Korean representatives, Azubu Frost, in the finals to the Flash Wolves tag as the “Korean Killers” from 2015 to 2017, LMS teams have been respected for their ability to go toe to toe with the biggest teams around the world.

 

 For many LMS fans, especially Flash Wolves supporters, the sight of Karsa in RNG colours represents the loss of mercurial homegrown talent to overseas regions.

For many LMS fans, especially Flash Wolves supporters, the sight of Karsa in RNG colours represents the loss of mercurial homegrown talent to overseas regions.

However, this region has also suffered greatly from the lack of investment that many of the other major regions have seen since its inception. Compared to China, Korea, Europe and North America, the LMS is hosted by Garena which meant that it has lagged behind the other major regions in terms of Riot investment into the scene. This is significant as this has resulted in many eligible players in the region leaving to join the much more lucrative Chinese LPL, such as Karsa in Royal Never Give Up, Amazing J who is a Hong Kong player that used to play for EDward Gaming and IMay to name a few. Thus, the drain on talent alongside its inherent limitation as a small region has led to a slide in the competitiveness of the region as a whole, culminating in the failure of any LMS teams qualifying for the knockout stages of Worlds 2018, the first since Season 4.

 

Even more worryingly, the direness of the LMS does not stop there, the decreasing talent pool has led to a distortion of the competitiveness of the league. Ever since 2016, the Flash Wolves has emerged as the premier team in the league, dominating the regular splits and regularly featuring in the finals. In 2018 Spring Split, the distortion has become worse as traditional powerhouses such as ahq e-Sports, J Team and Hong Kong Attitude struggled to remain competitive due to the loss of key personnel in their roster. Whilst teams such as MAD Team and G-Rex have surged to fill in the gap, their lack of experience is telling given their performances in the playoffs where MAD Team lost to G-Rex 0-3 and G-Rex to Flash Wolves by the same score line in the finals.

 With the departure of legendary veterans such as Westdoor, the LMS is now at a crossroad with a lack of talent that can fill the void left by these pioneers.

With the departure of legendary veterans such as Westdoor, the LMS is now at a crossroad with a lack of talent that can fill the void left by these pioneers.

As the Flash Wolves prepare to fight for their chance to participate in the knockout stages of MSI, the fact that they would have to compete against the winners of play-in groups should ring alarm bells for the league as a whole. Unless key changes are made to the structure of the competition and the fostering of local talents, other regions will continue to catch up through better utilisation of their resources. If the LMS wants to remain relevant against the backdrop of the giants of Chinese LPL or Korean LCK in Asia, it must reinvent itself to find its lost identity as a region that continues to defy expectation by playing with trademark tenacity and resolve.

 

Written by Alex Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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2018 Sydney Battlegrounds: UNSW vs WSU Finals Breakdown

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2018 Sydney Battlegrounds: UNSW vs WSU Finals Breakdown

It was a sunny Sunday afternoon and what better way to spend it then huddled inside your room, watching the highest level of League of Legends gameplay available. The Sydney Battlegrounds Grand Final pitted UNSW, represented by “Add Ozo if you’re an e-girl” against cross-town rivals Western Sydney University, represented by WSU 1. A rematch of last year’s Unigames finals, UNSW looked to redeem itself against a team that had yet to drop a single game the entire tournament. Although they had qualified for the finals, UNSW looked shaky in the semi-finals matchup against Macquarie University where they conceded early game advantages and made late game blunders which cost them game 2 of the series before Macquarie was disqualified. On the other hand, their opponents were heading into the finals in red-hot form and had yet to be challenged by a single team seriously until then.

 

Game 1

UNSW opened up the series in dominating fashion, crushing WSU with a strong early game and forcing consecutive teamfights, eventually building a solid 2k gold lead by 10min. With David “Ozo1329” Li leading from the front on his first Irelia pick of the tournament, UNSW were able to end the game with a 6k gold lead, a lead that proved insurmountable for WSU, whom despite finding key engagements from NL Pompom’s Rakan and K1LD3Rn3S5’s Zac, could not capitalise on these opportunities, resulting in WSU’s nexus collapsing in 36min.

 

Game 2

WSU bounced back in Game 2 by targeting Ozo’s Irelia, and Richard “kantos17” Chen’s Alistar in the first ban phase, the latter being a catalyst for success in their first game and one of kantos’s comfort picks. UNSW on blue side opted for first picking Kai’Sa for Stealthix, one of his more preferred picks, but in return gave WSU Xayah and Rakan, the game’s strongest bot lane in the current meta. UNSW would round out the composition with strong initiation between Galio and Camille. However WSU pulled out the surprise mid FIora for nL Beats which was pivotal in the game. UNSW started with signature early game aggression with Adrian “Morale’ Guo ganking early for ozo in the top lane in an attempt to snowball the Camille early. Whilst they were successful in doing so, UNSW neglected the rest of the map, especially the bottom lane where WSU abused the power of Xayah and Rakan to secure early drakes. With a losing bot lane, and Johnny “XternalRageX” Xiao’s Galio being pushed around in the mid lane by nL Beats’s Fiora. UNSW were unable to push their early advantages and eventually lost to the scaling of the Fiora to leave the series even at 1-1.

 

 The fateful moment when WSU1 locks in Fiora mid.

The fateful moment when WSU1 locks in Fiora mid.

Game 3

After having been shaken in a close game 2, UNSW adapted their strategy and changed gears. Picking red side, the team secured Rakan to deny the lovers bot lane from WSU, as well as banning nL Beats’s Fiora after his monstrous performance in the previous game. WSU opted for a blind Renekton pick in the hopes that their top laner would be able to at least go even against ozo during the laning phase after disastrous performances in the previous 2 matches. UNSW responded by last-picking Jax for ozo, a champion he had been known to carry with previously in the tournament. WSU doubled down on their bot side oriented strategy by diving Stealthix and kantos17 under the oppressive pushing power of their Xayah-Karma lane.  However, this was offset by ozo1329 in the top lane, who despite his on-paper laning disadvantage, was able to score 2 solo kills on the Renekton. WSU demonstrated better macro play by taking first tower and securing the outer mid tower in an early game snowball. UNSW kept themselves in the game by keeping the gold lead within 300 off ozo1329’s top lane performance. Eventually, UNSW swung the game back into their favour with 2 for 0 trade onto Renekton and K1LD3Rn3S5’s Warwick. Through this lucky break, UNSW was able to create pressure across the map with ozo’s split push in the bot lane, whilst the rest of the team forced WSU to commit mistakes around baron. A key engage from kantos17 gifted UNSW four kills for nothing and baron to close out the game.

 

Game 4

Game 4 saw a return to the blue side for UNSW. UNSW began with a first pick Kai’Sa for Stealthix, as well as comfort picks for both solo laners, Cho’gath for ozo1329 and XternalrageX’s Ahri. WSU opted to exploit UNSW’s weak link in the mid lane with Yasuo for nL Beats as XternalRageX had looked shaky in the previous 3 games, going down by as much as 12 CS at 10 minutes. The Yasuo paid dividends for WSU almost immediately, with nL Beats up 40 CS by 10 minutes with two solo kills to one. UNSW’s bot lane did not fare any better as Stealthix and kantos17 gave 2v2 kills to WSU. The bleeding continued when K1LD3Rn3S5 focused his attention onto the UNSW bot lane. Through two winning lanes, WSU was able to snowball their dominant early game into the mid and late game off the scaling of a fed Yasuo, securing two ocean drakes and baron before finishing the fastest game of the series at 22:42.

 

Game 5

With the series on the line, UNSW decided to shift their approach in the pick and ban phase to try revive their fortunes. UNSW decided to prioritise Sejuani for Morale and Jax for ozo in an attempt to strengthen their top side play. WSU responded with the Xayah-Rakan bot lane duo and Malphite, hoping that despite the mismatch, the tank will still be relevant in late game teamfights. UNSW also put their faith on XternalRageX to perform on Swain, one of his more preferred champions against nL Beats’ Viktor. The game had a quieter laning phase, perhaps due to the stakes of a game 5 weighing on their minds. However, ozo1329 was able to play with his usual confidence with an exceptional outplay that surely was a contender for play of the series. 

UNSW’s mid and bot lane also played their parts admirably as Stealthix and kantos17 opened up a bot lane lead against the traditionally strong Xayah-Rakan lane and XternalRageX held his own against nL Beats. Stability across the map gave Sejuani the room to move around to pull off successful ganks in the bot lane. The game completely turned in UNSW’s favour when XternalRageX sparked life into UNSW’s teamfights on the Swain, enabling the team to abuse the top lane mismatch in a 0-4-1 push. With the help of kantos17’s play making abilities on the Thresh, UNSW secured vital mid game objectives to slowly suffocate the WSU1 defence, eventuating in their victory off a strong baron push for the nexus.

 

Overall, this series was a battle between the early-tempo, mechanically gifted style embodied by UNSW, and the more patient macro, mid-game orientated WSU. Both teams played to their strengths but when push came to shove, UNSW pulled ahead on the day, earning redemption for their Unigames defeat last year. MVP of the Match goes to David “ozo1329” Li for providing UNSW the necessary foundation to win the series with his dominant top lane performances. Special mention must also go to the team’s analyst Kathy “sexymario258” Xu, who helped to steady the team after their crushing losses in games 2 and 4 and guide them to victory.

 

Written by Benjamin "RedPyroMage" Letran [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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2018 Sydney Battlegrounds: Interview with the Champions - UNSW

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2018 Sydney Battlegrounds: Interview with the Champions - UNSW

This interview was conducted and edited by Kenzo "MEME REVIEW" Jeanson [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee] with the 2018 Sydney Battlegrounds Champions from UNSW: "Add ozo if u r e-girl" after their thrilling 3-2 victory over WSU1.

Photography by Stephen "PHANSCENETH" Chan [2018 Marketing (Media) Subcommittee].

 

How did you guys feel before the series, and how did the series go to your expectations?

XternalRageX: We felt confident of course. Anyone should before a game - once you play without confidence you're just playing to lose. Everyone expects themselves to win, and we're no different. To be honest, we thought this series would only go to 4 games, but definitely can't complain about the final result!

 

 

How did you guys prepare for this series?

XternalRageX: We put quite a bit of time into preparing for this. From scrimming Dire Cubs, talking to our analyst Kathy (shoutout again to Kathy for being a great analyst) and scrimming other OOL/OCS teams, we were able to significantly improve our early game. We were all good friends before the tournament, so it was really easy to just play together. When the practice environment is good, it's a lot more motivating to play and improve!

 XternalRageX showing us his normal practice routine on one of his signature champions, Ahri.

XternalRageX showing us his normal practice routine on one of his signature champions, Ahri.

 

After a crushing defeat in game 4, tying up the series to a painstaking 2-2, how was the team mentality affected? Did you feel like you were able to recover?

XternalRageX: We always knew we had the better early game. It was about resetting our minds and not letting the past games affect us. For the people who watched the game, you can see that we used our 15 minute break to its fullest. During those crucial 15 minutes, we discussed what went wrong, what they did well and identified their main reasons for winning game 4. Then it was simply incorporating it into our picks and bans, and you could see that we changed our strategy by first picking Sejuani in game 5!

 

 

So Ozo, you convincingly won every matchup in each of the 5 games. In a series with boring matchups like game 5’s Jax vs Malphite, you still managed to make toplane very exciting to watch. Many of the discord spectators were voting you as series MVP! What do you feel contributed best to your success?

 Ozo1329 was quietly confident in his team's ability to get him into winning positions where he can display superior mechanics on carry champions such as Jax and Camille.

Ozo1329 was quietly confident in his team's ability to get him into winning positions where he can display superior mechanics on carry champions such as Jax and Camille.

Ozo1329: As a former top lane main back the in days of season 3 when bruiser/assassin meta was around, my forte is definitely knowing how to play volatile 1v1 matchups and how to split-push effectively. My team allowed me to play to my strengths by consistently applying pressure mid to bot side during the laning phase, and extending this to heavy baron/top-mid side pressure during the mid to late game. Moreover, effective wave control during the laning phase allowed me to accrue a large minion and experience advantage in most games, which made the split-push strategy more effective in the mid-late game. Lastly, our mid-laner's confidence in blind-picking his champion during the draft phase often meant that I was able to last pick a champion that not only counters my lane opponent, but also against the rest of WSU' line-up. This allowed me to have an easier time at all stages of the game against their team. Flash is also indeed, a great summoner spell.

 

 

Morale, as the jungler, you are the creator and facilitator of team plays. How did you feel the internal communications between your team was?

Morale: I felt that at first our internal communications was a bit lacking as some people did not speak up when they needed to. However, through scrims and team discussions, we managed to improve our team communication as each member would speak up and make calls when needed. In the end, I believe our team was strong in internal communications as every decision and opinion was clear and ensured everyone was in sync with every move.

 

 

As team captain and shotcaller, it could be said that you had to have an eye on the whole game- your team and the enemy team. Were there any situations where you feel like you had to make a game-changing call?

XternalRageX: One thing that differentiates our team from others is that we started off being really good friends. We don't have a main shotcaller but we do assign roles. For example, Kantos does our rotations and I primarily call teamfights. In a typical game, we are all feeding information to each other and then decide on the best play together. Hence no specific game-changing call was needed. It's a team effort!

 

 

Stealthix, you seem to be a big Kai’sa fan, having played her in 4 of the 5 games. What was the team’s justification for the pick?

Stealthix: Kai'sa was a strong pick for us as it was very well suited to our team play style in skirmishes and forced engages. She was a comfortable pick for me despite her nerfs to the laning phase and I was confident I could carry alongside my brethrens.

 

 

Kantos, regardless of Victory or Defeat, which game in the series did you, as a support, find the most challenging and why? Were there any games where UWS focused more on vision control/denial or an unfavourable botlane matchup?

Kantos17: Well, game 4 was the most challenging game of the series as WSU drafted stronger lanes and managed to snowball their lead which made the game very difficult for me as Braum, having to be in the front lines against the fed members of the WSU line-up. Game 2 WSU also drafted Rakan/Xayah against our Kai’sa/Tahm Kench which is quite an unfavourable lane matchup for us as it is hard for Tahm to display much aggression in lane against the mobile Rakan. Hence we had to focus on just farming in lane and making plays with Abyssal Voyage mid lane to counter their aggressive Fiora pick.

 The team watching AD Carry, Stealthix, in one of his matches. The friendship and trust between all the members were the key to their ability to handle the emotional roller coaster of a 5 match finals.

The team watching AD Carry, Stealthix, in one of his matches. The friendship and trust between all the members were the key to their ability to handle the emotional roller coaster of a 5 match finals.

 

Do you guys have anything to say to UNSW LoLSoc?

XternalRageX: I've heard a lot of praise about ozo1329 and Kantos17 from the community. I agree, they played amazing but I would like to quickly shoutout both Morale and Stealthix for their performance too. We won as a team and everybody contributed in their own way. Respect to the people who watched all 5 games, it made us winning feel even better. Look forward to us at Unigames this year!
 

 

 

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2018 MSI Play-Ins Power Ranking: Dire Times for Dire Wolves (or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love KaBuM!)

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2018 MSI Play-Ins Power Ranking: Dire Times for Dire Wolves (or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love KaBuM!)

The 2018 Mid-Season Invitational is getting close, with the first group stage draw having been done for the Play-In teams.

 The Play-In Groups

The Play-In Groups

The Play-In stage is where the smaller regions will compete for the chance to participate in the main MSI tournament. The group winners will be randomly paired against either Flash Wolves (LMS) or EVOS Esports (VCS), who received group stage byes due to their regions’ previous performances in international competitions.

Though wildcard teams are hard to gauge, all teams stand out in their own right, for good and bad reasons.

 

The power ranking is as follows:

1.  SuperMassive eSports (TCL)

Though the addition of Korean imports to every team has raised the level of competition throughout the TCL, SuperMassive has emerged as the clear powerhouse in Turkey, going 26-2 in the regular season. Bolstered by the performances of mid laner GBM and support SnowFlower who seem to be a step above their fellow Korean imports, SuperMassive should be looked upon as favourites to enter the main event.

2.  Flash Wolves (LMS)

Player movement in and out of the LMS has made Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau harder to evaluate than before. The Wolves’ primary competition in the LMS have all appeared to regress, with ahq e-Sports Club and Hong Kong Attitude both missing the playoffs. Though jungler Karsa departed for China, mid laner Maple, AD carry Betty and support SwordArt returned to the team after 2017 Worlds. Whilst not as competitive as before, the LMS is still a premier region in comparison to other wildcards and should be contending to compete in the main event.

 The Flash Wolves have been consistently the most dominant team in the ever weakening LMS. They will be out to show that the LMS is still a formidable region which can compete with the big boys in the major regions.

The Flash Wolves have been consistently the most dominant team in the ever weakening LMS. They will be out to show that the LMS is still a formidable region which can compete with the big boys in the major regions.

3.  Rainbow7 (LLN)

Despite a tumultuous preseason, with a legal battle surrounding the team’s branding and star AD carry WhiteLotus being suspended for the entire split due to toxicity in SoloQ, the team formerly known as Lyon Gaming won their tenth championship in a row. The organisation has confirmed that WhiteLotus will return for MSI, but this change opens up questions of roster synergy and competitive readiness, questions that cannot be answered until matchday. However, WhiteLotus may simply return to the form he had during 2017 Worlds and help Latin America North to get into the main event for the first time in the region’s history.


4.  KaBuM! e-Sports (CBLOL)

The original giant slayers, Europe’s nightmare and North America’s hero, return to international competition for the first time since their famous performance at 2014 Worlds. None of the current roster has international experience (goodnight LEP sweet 0/16/2 prince), though what they lack in quality, they make up for in sheer tenacity, particularly their star AD carry TitaN. Close games up to and including their championship suggest that KaBuM! may not be able to replicate the same magic they once were able to conjure. However, Brazil is a more competitive region than ever before and KaBuM! were able to create their own luck against considerably more-experienced opposition throughout the 2018 CBLOL Summer Season. Though lightning may not strike the same place twice, it seems to strike wherever KaBuM! goes! Perhaps it will create a path to the main event and the chance to make history once again.

 Will Kabum! capture our hearts with another daring run at a major international tournament? Only time will tell.

Will Kabum! capture our hearts with another daring run at a major international tournament? Only time will tell.

5.  EVOS Esports (VCS)

EVOS Esports represent the VCS in Vietnam’s first ever international event as a separate region after being grouped with the rest of Southeast Asia in the GPL in previous years. Though the region may now have the prestige of a group stage bye, showings by teams other than the Gigabyte Marines in previous international events such as Young Generation at 2017 Worlds suggest that the region as a whole is still weak. The team is experienced, with former Gigabyte Marine Stark holding the top lane, but look unlikely to make it into the main event.


6.  Gambit Esports (LCL)

The fusion of Gambit Gaming and Albus NoX Luna returns to the international scene once more after disappointing at 2017 Worlds. The team has substituted 2017 Worlds weak-link Blasting with the younger AD carry in Lodik alongside legends such as jungler Diamondprox and support Edward. Though the nostalgia of Moscow Five, Gambit Gaming and Albus NoX Luna seems to fuel hope that this team can bring the CIS back to the forefront of competitive League, the reality of a weak region and dismal recent international performances should check the expectations for this team, though that should not stop fans from being eager to support behind this team (cyka blyat).

 

7.  Dire Wolves (OPL)

The second quintet of Wolves during the Play-In stage, Sydney’s very own Dire Wolves seek to finally pass the test of an international event. Chippys (pls stop), Shernfire and k1ng return from the 2017 Worlds roster with Triple replacing Phantiks in the mid lane and Cupcake replacing Destiny as support. Whilst Triple is certainly an upgrade over Phantiks, Cupcake seems to be on the same level as Destiny. Though the team dominated the regular season, going 20-4, they needed five games to take down Chiefs Esports Club for the championship. Unfortunately, as some of our international students may know through comparison back on their home servers, Oceania is a rather weak region, even compared to other minor servers. Prepare for a repeat of 2017 Worlds; disappointment despite having no expectations.

 The Direwolves were dominant in Oceania, but Oceania is one of the smaller regions in the professional League of Legends scene. It will take a miracle to see the Direwovles make it into the main event.

The Direwolves were dominant in Oceania, but Oceania is one of the smaller regions in the professional League of Legends scene. It will take a miracle to see the Direwovles make it into the main event.

8.  PENTAGRAM (LJL)

The team formerly known as Rampage sports a much different roster than 2017 Worlds. Though AD carry YutoriMoyasi and mid laner Ramune remain, visa issues with previous Korean imports Dara and Tussle saw them bring in new imports in the form of jungler Once and support Gaeng. These new imports lack competitive experience, with the former being a sub for Hong Kong Assassins and the latter having not played at the competitive level since 2016. The aforementioned visa issues saw the team penalised for the first five weeks of the split by being down one game every series, having to sweep their way to victory. Do not take this as a positive indicator of their competitiveness, Japan is still very much a developing region and PENTAGRAM will struggle on the big stage.

 

9.  Kaos Latin Gamers (CLS)

Though four out of five members are back from their 2017 Worlds squad, Kaos Latin Gamers did not show much promise then and not much should change at MSI. Much more than synergy is required to place first, especially in a group as tough as the one Latin America South’s very own find themselves in. The region has historically struggled against fellow wildcards, dating back to Season 4 where none other than KaBuM! e-Sports swept PEX Team to qualify for 2014 Worlds.

 This will be Ascension Gaming's first venture into a major international tournament. Their inexperience means that it will be unlikely for them to advance far into the tournament.

This will be Ascension Gaming's first venture into a major international tournament. Their inexperience means that it will be unlikely for them to advance far into the tournament.

10.  Ascension Gaming (GPL)

The GPL, having just lost Vietnam, are even weaker than before, with Thailand’s Ascension Gaming finally making an international event after having fallen countless times to Vietnam in the GPL tournament. Some familiar faces are present on this team, with mid laner G4 and AD carry Lloyd’s last international showing being at 2015 Worlds on Bangkok Titans (Lloyd you kicked over the grill). However, most of the roster have recently undergone role swaps, hampering their synergy. If Ascension Gaming can pick up a single win, they will leave Berlin happy.

 

 

- Written by Iain "Arkk003" Lew [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

- Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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Sydney Battlegrounds Finals Preview

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Sydney Battlegrounds Finals Preview

finals Preview

The Sydney Battlegrounds finals is shaping to be an incredible hyped best-of-5 between WSU and our home representatives from UNSW. Both teams are defined by their love to fight, promising an exciting and bloody matchup. The UNSW team, in particular, ended the round robin with a whooping 52 team KDA. For comparison, the next highest was 17.8 by team WSU 1. The team also have a preference for a high-tempo, snowball playstyle, with all their match victories coming under 30 minutes. Notably, two victories came before 20 minutes in the round robin stage.

The team has dropped only one game so far, to a Macquarie University team which was later disqualified for account sharing in the semi-finals.  In a preview of this match-up, we’ll be looking at the starting line-up from UNSW, as well as pointing out what to watch out for in this thrilling series.


Top: David “Ozo1329” Li

Champions played: Vlad, Cho’gath, Jax

Elo: Diamond 1

The star player for this UNSW line-up, watch for “Ozo” to be carrying his team through the finals. Showing an exceptional carry performance on Jax in game 2 of the semi-finals by picking up multiple solo kills against Macquarie in the semi-finals, and dominating performances on Cho’gath and Vladimir throughout the round robin, look to Ozo to smash his lane opponents and exert pressure in the split-push and team fights. He has put up impressive numbers, averaging 30% of team damage in the round robin, and looks to carry this performance into the grand finals

 

Jungle: Adrian “Morale” Guo

Champions played: Sejuani, Jax, Skarner, Olaf

Elo: Platinum II

The Jungler for UNSW, Morale, has proven an indomitable force in the early game, especially on the likes of Olaf and Sejuani, ganking early for his laners and securing early elemental drakes. Look for him to snowball his lanes in order to close out games early.

 

Mid: Johnny “XternalRageX” Xiao

Champions played: Galio, Swain, Ahri

Elo: Diamond I

The stalwart in the mid lane, XternalRageX anchors the team as he holds his own in the lane, able to play passively and not give up on any advantages. Whilst not as exciting as watching say Faker or Bjergsen, XternalRageX performs the role his team needs him to, providing a solid base from which the team can play around.

 

ADC: Nicholas “Stealthix” Tian

Champions played: Kai’sa, Ezreal, Caitlyn

Elo: Diamond V

The janitor of the team, Steathix comes alive in the team-fight stages of the game, picking up kill after kill on his Ezreal and Kai’sa. Putting up staggering KDA numbers such as 12, 14, and 17, Stealthix manages to navigate the team-fights, outputting the damage that help put UNSW into the finals.

 

Support: Richard “kantos17” Chen

Champions played: Karma, Taric, Janna, Tahm Kench

Elo: Diamond IV

In a meta that has favoured tank supports, kantos17 has bucked the trend with his preference for lane-dominant, mage supports such as Karma, using the lane pressure to help Morale secure early objectives. He has also shown strong performances on the Tahm Kench, giving his teammates and escape option as well as using the extra mobility to close out games quickly through faster rotations.


Watch for the team to play their finals at 12PM 22/04/18 at https://mixer.com/OverheadBat7925. Given their play-style throughout the tournament, the UNSW boys are guaranteed to give you an entertaining match that will leave you blown away by their speed.

 

Written by Benjamin “RedPyroMage” Letran [2018 Marketing (Publications) Subcommittee]

Edited by Alex "Aldiko9" Wong [2018 Marketing (Publications) Director]

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